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ceramides

  • “Ceramide-containing moisturizers may offer benefits as an adjunct to acne treatment.” – from the Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 2014 Mar;7(3):18-26; Moisturizers and Ceramide-containing Moisturizers May Offer Concomitant Therapy with Benefits
  • Since ceramides are naturally found in your skin and a reduction in the amount of ceramides may result in dry skin and dermatitis, it’s been said found that “Adding ceramides to skin-care products can help to restore the skin’s barrier system.” (Sources: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, June 2005, pages 215–223; Journal of Dermatological Science, September 2006, pages 159–169; Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, September–October 2001, pages 261–271; and Cutis, December 2005, Supplemental, pages 7–12).

 

  • In a randomized, double-blind trial on treating mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, a ceramide and magnesium cream with hydrocortisone (group 1) versus a ceramide and magnesium cream with cold cream (group 2) was studied. After 6 weeks of treatment, group 1 showed comparable significant improvement in dermatitis lesions and TEWL, while in group 2, the decrease in dermatitis lesions and TEWL was significantly greater after treatment with ceramide and magnesium cream compared with cold cream. Finally, ceramide and magnesium cream was more effective in improving skin hydration and maintenance of levels of NMF than hydrocortisone and cold cream.
  • Another study compared the effects of a 5% urea and ceramide NP in an emollient cream versus just the emollient cream. The subjects were all over 60 years old with dry skin. The urea + ceramide NP cream hydrated the skin to a significantly greater extent and for a longer period of time compared to the control emollient cream. Furthermore, the urea + ceramide NP cream imparted additional benefits to the structure and function of the skin barrier not exhibited by the control emollient. This is all pretty great, but attests more to the power of 5% urea than Ceramide NP, in my opinion. I would have liked to see a 5% urea cream versus a Ceramide NP cream.
  • In a Japanese study, 8 people’s eyelids were treated with a ceramide gel for four weeks and found significantly improvement in the water retention ability of eyelid skin of patients with mild atopic blepharitis. They also found that the ceramide gel was a great supplement to strong anti-inflammatory drugs or to use alone for periods of relatively light inflammation.
  • A French study, showed that topical ceramides with other skin lipids (phytosphingosine, cholesterol & linoleic acid) improved skin barrier repair versus an emulsion of only 2 types of ceramides.
  • Sphingolipids from a lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus) was applied topically and increased skin-ceramide levels. It was suggested that the experimental cream was able to improve the lipid barrier and to increase a resistance against ageing-associated dry skin.

FUN FACT: Ceramide 3 is known to be a difficult substance to be dispersed in an aqueous solution so it has to be mixed with other ingredients. It’s been found that Ceramide 1 and Ceramide 3 may work together.

In addition to ceramides, you’ll also find phytoceramides and sphingolipids listed on ingredient lists. Phytoceramides are the plant-derived equivalent of ceramides, usually wheat. Examples of specific sphingolipids are ceramides. The term refers to a broad group of certain beneficial fatty acid-type ingredients.

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