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gold extract

Gold is a well-known irritant and skin sensitizer, especially on the eyelids and rest of the face. Gold won the title of Allergen of the Year in 2001 from The American Contact Dermatitis Society. Claims of gold helping to create electric charges in skin to trigger wrinkle repair have not been proven in any scientific study. There is no published research proving that gold, of any kind, has any anti-aging or anti-wrinkle effects.

Colloidal gold was proven in a very small and old study that it might benefit rheumatoid arthritis, possibly because it may have anti-inflammatory properties.

While gold and gold colorant (CI 74480) may look really awesome in selfies, especially in facial masks and eye masks, it hasn’t been proven to do much of anything for your skin, besides possibly irritate it. If you’ve taken a high school chemistry course, you’ll know that heavy metals don’t belong on your face. Still, while gold in cosmetics is unregulated, it’s been proven to be eliminated in urine anyway.

Sources
Beautypedia
Garner L. Contact dermatitis to metals. Dermatol Ther. 2004;17(4):321-7.
Forte G, Petrucci F, Bocca B. Metal allergens of growing significance: epidemiology, immunotoxicology, strategies for testing and prevention. Inflamm Allergy Drug Targets. 2008;7(3):146-62.
Ehrlich A, Belsito D. Allergic contact dermatitis to gold. Cutis. 2000;65(5):323-6.
Vazirnia A, Jacob S. Review ACDS’ Allergen of the Year 2000-2015. The Dermatologist. 2014;22(11).
Paciotti G, Myer L, Weinreich D, Goia D, Pavel N, McLaughlin R, Tamarkin L. Colloidal gold: a novel nanoparticle vector for tumor directed drug delivery. Drug Deliv. 2004;11(3):169-83.

Latest news
Researchers use fungus to create gold nanoparticles, which are often added to cosmetics for luxury marketing, June 2016

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